The Science of Water Filtration

Ophora Water is a pure, natural and oxygen rich. Our water is Nano-purified, Alkaline and Re-mineralized increasing its ability to improve overall health.

Nano-Purified

Commercial reverse osmosis (RO) membrane technology has advanced only incrementally over the last 30 years. However, Biomimetic Membranes for Water Purification, developed by Albuquerque-based Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico, represent a new approach to biomimetic membrane design and fabrication.

Alkaline

Because our blood pH level is slightly alkaline between 7.365 and 7.465, ionized alkaline drinking water with a pH of 8.0-9.5, is able to help restore the body’s natural pH balance, there are numerous health benefits to drinking ionized alkaline water from a water ionizer. Although the FDA states that nothing but a drug can be used to “treat, cure, or prevent a disease,” the research on water is clear: people who are well hydrated function better mentally and physically and are less susceptible to disease and ailments such as fatigue, heat stroke, headaches, backaches, and hundreds of other dehydration-related issues.

Organic Purity

Water purification is the process of removing undesirable chemicals, biological contaminants, suspended solids and gases from contaminated water. The goal is to produce water fit for a specific purpose. Most water is purified for human consumption (drinking water), but water purification may also be designed for a variety of other purposes, including meeting the requirements of medical, pharmacological, chemical and industrial applications.  Although oxidation reactions are crucial for life, they can also be damaging. Plants and animals maintain complex systems of multiple types of antioxidants, such as glutathione, vitamin C, and vitamin E as well as enzymes such as catalase, superoxide dismutase and various peroxidases.

Remineralized

Purified water is water that is mechanically filtered or processed to be cleaned for consumption. Distilled water and deionized (DI) water have been the most common forms of purified water, but water can also be purified by other processes including reverse osmosis, carbon filtration, microfiltration, ultrafiltration, ultraviolet oxidation, or electrodialysis. In recent decades, a combination of the above processes have come into use to produce water of such high purity that its trace contaminants are measured in parts per billion (ppb) or parts per trillion (ppt).